Auto Focus

Auto Focus Camera Chart

Model Types

STC-AF243LVD

STC-AF134DV

STC-AFCM133DV

Imager 1/2.8'' CMOS(LVD)
1/2.8'' CMOS(SDI)
1/4'' CMOS 1/3'' CMOS
Sensors IMX136 IMX104 IMX076
Resolution 1080P 720p 720p
Frequency - 60Hz and 50Hz 60Hz and 50Hz
Signal Format HD 1080p; DVI 1.0; RGB HD 720p; DVI 1.0; RGB HD 720p; DVI 1.0; RGB
Lens Types 20x Zoom Lens Without Closeup Lens Without Closeup Lens
Auto Focus Lens 20x Optical Zoom 11x Optical Zoom 11x Optical Zoom
Dimension  53 (W) x 60.5 (H) x 89.5 (D) mm  55.5 (W) x 48.5 (H) x 76 (D) mm  55.5 (W) x 48.5 (H) x 76 (D) mm

 

Auto Focus HD 720p


Sentech's Auto Focus Camera Series is specifically designed for medical, low vision and industrial applications. The Auto Focus series features 1/4" and 1/3" CMOS sensors, HD 720p, 60 fps, and a true 16:9 aspect ratio. These low cost, high performance CMOS cameras output both DVI (via HDMI connector) and LVDS signals, and have On-Board Low Vision features.


  Powerful 11X, 18X & 22X Optical Zoom Capabilities

  1/3" & 1/4" CMOS Sensors

  On-Board Low Vision Features



Auto Focus HD CMOS Models

Standard Lens Sensor Frequency Pixel Array Signal Format Size
STC-AF134DV 1/4" 50 & 60Hz 1280 X 720 HD 720p; DVI 1.0; RGB 55.5 x 48.5 x 76 mm
STC-AFCM133DV 1/3" 50 & 60Hz 1280 X 720 HD 720p; DVI 1.0; RGB 55.5 x 48.5 x 76 mm
STC-AF243LVD 1/2.8" 50 & 60Hz 1920 X 1080 HD 1080p; DVI 1.0; RGB 53 x 60 x 89.5 mm


Mechanical Drawing Auto Focus CMOS


STC-AF134DV


Responsive image

STC-AFCM133DV


Responsive image

STC-AF243LVD


Responsive image

STC-AF243SDI


Responsive image

What is Auto Focus?


An Auto Focus (or AF) optical system uses a sensor, a control system and a motor to focus fully automatic or on a manually selected point or area. An electronic rangefinder has a display instead of the motor; the adjustment of the optical system has to be done manually until indication. The methods are named by the used sensor: Active, passive and hybrid.


Auto Focus systems rely on one or more sensors to determine correct focus. Some AF systems rely on a single sensor, while others use an array of sensors. Most modern SLR cameras use through-the-lens optical AF sensors, with a separate sensor array providing light metering, although the latter can be programmed to prioritize its metering to the same area as one or more of the AF sensors. Through-the-lens optical autofocusing is now often speedier and more precise than can be achieved manually with an ordinary viewfinder, although more precise manual focus can be achieved with special accessories such as focusing magnifiers. Autofocus accuracy within 1/3 of the depth of field (DOF) at the widest aperture of the lens is not uncommon in professional AF SLR cameras. Most multi-sensor AF cameras allow manual selection of the active sensor, and many offer automatic selection of the sensor using algorithms which attempt to discern the location of the subject. Some AF cameras are able to detect whether the subject is moving towards or away from the camera, including speed and acceleration data, and keep focus on the subject — a function used mainly in sports and other action photography; on Canon cameras this is known as AI servo, while on Nikon cameras it is known as "continuous focus". The data collected from AF sensors is used to control an electromechanical system that adjusts the focus of the optical system. A variation of autofocus is an electronic rangefinder, a system in which focus data are provided to the operator, but adjustment of the optical system is still performed manually. The speed of the AF system is highly dependent on the maximum aperture offered by the lens. F-stops of around f/2 to f/2.8 are generally considered optimal in terms of focusing speed and accuracy. Faster lenses than this (e.g.: f/1.4 or f/1.8) typically have very low depth of field, meaning that it takes longer to achieve correct focus, despite the increased amount of light. Most consumer camera systems will only autofocus reliably with lenses that have a maximum aperture of at least f/5.6, while professional models can often cope with lenses that have a maximum aperture of f/8, which is particularly useful for lenses used in conjunction with teleconverters.


What is CMOS?


Complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) /ˈsiːmɒs/ is a technology for constructing integrated circuits. CMOS technology is used in microprocessors, microcontrollers, static RAM, and other digital logic circuits. CMOS technology is also used for several analog circuits such as image sensors (CMOS sensor), data converters, and highly integrated transceivers for many types of communication. Frank Wanlass patented CMOS in 1963 (US patent 3,356,858). CMOS is also sometimes referred to as complementary-symmetry metal–oxide–semiconductor (or COS-MOS).[1] The words "complementary-symmetry" refer to the fact that the typical digital design style with CMOS uses complementary and symmetrical pairs of p-type and n-type metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) for logic functions.[2] Two important characteristics of CMOS devices are high noise immunity and low static power consumption. Since one transistor of the pair is always off, the series combination draws significant power only momentarily during switching between on and off states. Consequently, CMOS devices do not produce as much waste heat as other forms of logic, for example transistor–transistor logic (TTL) or NMOS logic, which normally have some standing current even when not changing state. CMOS also allows a high density of logic functions on a chip. It was primarily for this reason that CMOS became the most used technology to be implemented in VLSI chips. The phrase "metal–oxide–semiconductor" is a reference to the physical structure of certain field-effect transistors, having a metal gate electrode placed on top of an oxide insulator, which in turn is on top of a semiconductor material. Aluminium was once used but now the material is polysilicon. Other metal gates have made a comeback with the advent of high-k dielectric materials in the CMOS process, as announced by IBM and Intel for the 45 nanometre node and beyond.


What is Resolution? (What is Auto Focus good for?)


Image resolution is the detail an image holds. The term applies to raster digital images, film images, and other types of images. Higher resolution means more image detail. Image resolution can be measured in various ways. Basically, resolution quantifies how close lines can be to each other and still be visibly resolved. Resolution units can be tied to physical sizes (e.g. lines per mm, lines per inch), to the overall size of a picture (lines per picture height, also known simply as lines, TV lines, or TVL), or to angular subtenant. Line pairs are often used instead of lines; a line pair comprises a dark line and an adjacent light line. A line is either a dark line or a light line. A resolution 10 lines per millimeter means 5 dark lines alternating with 5 light lines, or 5 line pairs per millimeter (5 LP/mm). Photographic lens and film resolution are most often quoted in line pairs per millimeter.

 
 

   Tele: 972-481-9223

|

   US Toll Free: 1 (877)-736-8324

|

   Fax: 972-481-9209